As spotted owl’s numbers keep falling, some fear it’s doomed

By Warren Cornwall
The Seattle Times

Buffeted by years of logging and the invasion of a tougher owl, populations of the northern spotted owl are falling year after year, despite sweeping protections for the old-growth forests it inhabits. Now, genetic problems are adding to the reasons for worry. A just-released study found the remaining birds are so genetically similar, they are at risk of entering an “extinction vortex.”  Read more…

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